Nurse Shot and Killed in Hospital, after telling off Supply Worker, who also Shoots another employee before Killing himself.

RISKAlert Report Updated:  March 16, 2018

The shooting took place after long-time nursing supervisor, Nancy Swift, 63, told off Trevis Coleman, a hospital Sterile Supply worker, described as “disgruntled” by police.  After fatally shooting Swift, he shot instrument worker, Tim Isley, who is in critical condition.  Coleman then turned the gun on himself, with a fatal shot to the head.

The incident took place at University of Alabama at Birmingham, Highlands’s hospital in Birmingham, Alabama.  UAB Hospital Vice President Anthony Patterson said, ‘We have extensive security measures in place that include police officers on site 24-7 as well as others that we do not publicly disclose in the interest of safety.

“This is a sad day for Birmingham UAB. We lost a colleague and a friend last night,” UAB Hospital Vice President Anthony Patterson said. “First I want to offer my sincerest condolences to the victims who have suffered and to their family and colleagues who are grieving this senseless loss of life and injury, our highest priority is the health and safety of our patients and employees.”
The surviving victim of the shooting, 28-year-old Timothy Isley, is recovering at UAB Hospital. He was the on-duty instrument management supervisor at the time of the shooting. Isley’s father is a Mayor of Springville, Alabama,

UAB Highlands hospital had metal detectors in use at the time of the workplace violence incident.


  1. ‘Disgruntled’ employees need to have a formal case file opened on them, and their
    behavior monitored, if they have the potential to be a threat.
  2.  Keeping all back entrances locked, and using door alarms, can keep staff, and intruders
    from bringing guns and knives into hospitals.


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Angry Florida Man Steals Hospital’s Ambulance and Drives Home After Waiting Two hours in the Hospital’s Emergency Department

RISKAlert Report Updated:  March 14, 2018

   Ambulance thief, Danny Lee Konieczny, 60,  was drunk and suicidal when First Responders picked him
up after a neighbor called 911.    He was transported to The Villages Regional Hospital, where
he waited two hours in the Emergency Department without seeing a doctor.

Frustrated and angry, he decided to steal the ambulance to drive the 5.7 miles to his home,
according to the arrest affidavit!  He walked outside and stole a Sumter EMS Ambulance, which was
owned by Rural/Metro and equipped with a GPS tracking device.  Rural/Metro personnel were able
to see the theft of the ambulance on a live feed and so deputies followed the GPS to Konieczny’s home.

The suspect had parked the ambulance in the neighbor’s     
driveway, and then hid in the trunk of his car,  where
officers found him and arrested him.   Konieczny is now
facing a felony charge of grand theft of a motor vehicle
following the arrest by Lake County Sheriff’s deputies.

   “He was upset because he was just put in the hallway
to wait and was not being seen at the hospital
deputy wrote in the arrest report.  The ambulance was
recovered intact and returned to Rural/Metro.


  1. Ambulance theft is relatively common but easy to prevent. Experts recommend
    making sure to turn off the engine and lock all ambulance doors.
  2. There are keypad systems that can be installed to prevent someone from driving away in
    an ambulance, when the engine has been left running.


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Deputy Didn’t Fire and 17 People Died

“Good Guy with Gun” Didn’t Work at Parkland’s School Shooting Sheriff’s Deputy was Armed and
On site During Incident, but Stayed 
Out to Save Himself, Leaving Students and Staff to Die

RISKAlert Report Updated: Feb 23, 2018

According to Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel, there was an armed Sheriff’s deputy on the scene of the Parkland Massacre.

He stood outside while the shooter hunted down and murdered seventeen children and staff members. The deputy could hear the screaming and the gunfire. But he let the shooting carry on for minutes that literally meant life or death.

“I’m Devastated. Sick to my stomach. There are no words. These families lost their children. We lost coaches. I’ve been to the funerals,” Sheriff Israel, obviously shaken, said at a press conference on Thursday. Asked what the officer should have done, Israel responded, “Went in. Addressed the killer. Killed the killer.”

The cowardly deputy, Scott Peterson, who left the children to fend for themselves, was put on administrative leave and now has resigned. A security camera caught the deputy outside the building, within earshot of the shootings.

In the aftermath of the tragedy, other issues in the law enforcement response have come to light, including two other deputies were placed on restricted duty on Thursday because they may have mishandled tips called in to the sheriff’s office over the past two years warning that the suspect, Nikolas Cruz, appeared intent on becoming a school shooter, Sheriff Israel said


1. ACCESS CONTROL MAKES THE DIFFERENCE. Obviously, arming teachers
won’t work.  Metal detectors work 100% of the time, and don’t hang back in
the parking lot.

2. Starting Monday, we can help schools LOCK THEIR DOORS, get some basic Access
    Controls in place,  and commit to PROTECTING THESE STUDENTS!


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6 Steps to Prevent School Shootings like the Parkland Massacre

Reprinted with permission from SecurityInfoWatch

6 steps schools can immediately take to protect against active shooters


As an active shooter expert, the last thing I expected yesterday was a shooting in my own neighborhood. I left a meeting at about 2:30 ET and noticed that there were sirens and emergency vehicles everywhere. They were racing to respond to an alert at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which has now become the site of one of the worst school shootings in American history.

Parkland is an affluent residential community that backs up to the Everglades. The school was named to honor Stoneman Douglas, an environmentalist who fought to protect Florida’s Everglades. In fact, just this week, the city was ranked as the 15th safest city in America and one of the safest cities in Florida.

But it could not be protected from an active shooter. Minutes after the ambulances flew by; I got the alert on my phone: an active shooter situation practically in my own backyard.  By the next morning, we knew much more.

Initially, it was reported as one person dead but by late last night, however; the number had ballooned to 17 students and staff killed, and fifteen more in the hospital.  It was the 18th school shooting of 2018, which averages out to almost one every other day so far this year.

A former student, identified as 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, was arrested near the school. He allegedly entered the school with the other students and pulled the fire alarm, so they would run out into the hall where he opened fire. In addition to shooting students inside the building he also reportedly took aim at victims as they attempted to flee the hail of gunfire.

The shooter’s weapon of choice was an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, which was purchased legally last year from a Broward County gun shop. Cruz made his first court appearance on Thursday and was charged with seventeen counts of first degree murder. 

A student interviewed by the media said he knew the kid who had the gun, and that the student had shown him photos of guns on his phone. Cruz’s Instagram account also reportedly featured not only photos of guns, but of frogs and lizards he had tortured and then killed. According to published reports, he had posted on social media: “I’m going to be a professional school shooter.”

Many students who were interviewed yesterday and today said the shooter was someone they thought might have been a dangerous person. He had a troubled background, including behavioral problems, and had been recently expelled from the school.

As politicians on every TV channel discussed the future of gun control, the political aspects of America’s gun problem and the role of the National Rifle Association in effectively blocking gun legislation, the real truth is that we need to protect schools now, not fight endlessly about long term solutions. The great technological advances in security have created realistic security solutions that can better protect students and schools today.

Immediate Steps to Shore Up School Security

  1. Access control is the starting point.  If you can’t control access, anyone can bring any kind of guns into our schools.  Stand-alone metal detectors are relatively inexpensive and easy to install. Wand scanners could be deployed tomorrow.  Backpacks and cases need to be scanned or opened.
  2. Limit and alarm entrances to the schools. No school is secure if there are multiple entrances, and if anyone can enter the school undetected.  All exterior doors should be locked 100 percent of the time, not propped open, and doors should be checked weekly to make sure they close effectively.
  3. Actively monitor security cameras. Cameras should be set up for active monitoring on every egress door, so that if a shooter somehow gets in, they can be discovered at the first shot and then isolated so that students are removed from the immediate area. Students could have been prevented from putting themselves in harm’s way, or even rescued.
  4. Leverage gunshot detection solutions. Gunshot detection software can alert at the sound of the first round fired.
  5. Color photo ID badges should be issued to every student and worn at all times. They cost almost nothing and instantly help to keep people out who should not be in the facility, such as the shooter who carried out this massacre.6.  Use bullet-resistant backpacks and white boards. Though they can’t stop a gunman, these products can help children and staff protect themselves when all else fails.

Florida schools are required to “lockdown” if an active shooter code is called. This is not an effective procedure and the number of victims in the Parkland massacre show that it is ineffective. It does not limit the shooter once they are inside the facility and it prevents students from being able to exit quickly.

Once again, as was the case in the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, we saw law enforcement holding back instead of entering the school sooner and finding and eliminating the shooter before he kills more students and then just strolls away down the street.

Long Term Solutions

Long term solutions should always be pursued but they must include a national discussion on access to lethal and automatic weapons. More stringent background checks need to be implemented, as we have seen with every active shooter incident, including the 2013 shooting at Los Angeles International Airport, the aforementioned massacre at the Pulse nightclub and even the 2016 New York bombing in which the suspect’s father called the FBI to report his child was planning to kill people and nothing was done.

These are long-term political solutions, but the conversation today and tomorrow and the day after that needs to be about preventing school shootings and mass casualty events, which require the implementation of mandatory controls/solutions that can be deployed tomorrow, not in three years.

Back in Parkland, this close knit community has been terrorized and there is no resolution. The most aggravating thing about the Parkland massacre is: one more time, it’s too late. No matter how many drills and training were done, it didn’t help.

About the Author:

Caroline Ramsey-Hamilton is a risk expert and Futurist, who creates innovative facility security risk assessment solutions, including how to prevent active shooters and workplace  violence in healthcare, education, government, and manufacturing sectors. As part of the DoD Defense Industrial Base, she lives in South Florida near Parkland, and works every day to keep people safe.


Seventeen Killed, Fifteen Wounded in Parkland School Shooting

RISKAlert Report # 1012


Update:  February 14, 2018

Parkland Deadly School Shooting 2 miles from me and here’s what I saw for
Valentine’s Day – BULLETS NOT FLOWERS at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas
High School

3rd Deadliest School Shooting in History – called a SCHOOL MASSACRE

I live right next to Parkland, FL and was out shopping at 2:30 when I heard the sirens from about a dozen
police cars and emergency vehicles. They followed the street right by my house, and as soon I got home,
I checked the TV and saw what had happened – another  deadly School Shooting.

Parkland is usually so quiet, just YESTERDAY it was named safest city in the US. Another student said he
knew the kid who had the gun, and that the student had shown him photos of guns on his phone

The shooter, now identified as Nikolas Cruz, was caught in his care close to  the school, and has been
charged in court. Fifteen others are till in the hospital.

I could see the police helicopter from my upstairs window.
So when I do active shooter assessments for healthcare
and other critical organiztions all day, and write about these incidents every day and night.

Here’s the real thing – right next to me!

My kids are out of school, but my hear still stopped, and I wanted to call every parent I know and check on their kids.  I dread seeing the list of the injured. My grandson’s classmate’s father was killed.  He was a coach at the high school.

So now this close knit community has been terrorized and there is no resolution. The person in custody is only
19-20 years old himself, and, accordingly to one of his friends, thought that having guns was ‘really cool’.
Well – it’s not really cool. It’s really horrible, really stupid.

The most aggravating thing about this is: One more time, it’s too late. No access control = high chance of
active shooter. No checking or scanning backpacks and here’s what you get. Dead and injured children
and teachers. 



This can happen anywhere, and it just happened again!

Contact me directly at


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$ 3.5 Million Dollar Fine for Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) to settle potential violations of the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules for FIVE different breaches.

RISKAlert Report Updated: Feb 2, 2018

FMCNA, a German company with US Operations based in  Waltham, Massachusetts, has agreed to pay a hefty $ 3.5 million dollar fine that covers 5 separate HIPAA Violations.

FMCNA is a provider of products and services for people with chronic kidney failure with over 60,000 employees that serves over 170,000 patients. Their facilities include dialysis facilities, outpatient cardiac and vascular labs, and urgent care centers, as well as hospitals and post-acute care providers.

US Dept. of Health and Human Services said the company failed to heed HIPAA’s risk analysis and risk management rules. FMCNA is also required to adopt a Comprehensive Corrective Action Plan. DHHS’ Office of Civil Rights,(OCR) investigation into the data incidents found that FMCNA covered entities failed to conduct an accurate and thorough risk analysis of potential risks and vulnerabilities to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of all of its ePHI.

The breaches spanned three states including Florida, Alabama, and Georgia. Each provider had specific
deficiencies and the Agreement calls out each deficiency by provider. You can read the entire Resolution Agreement at

Fresenius Medical Care’s corporate headquarters is in Bad Homburg, Germany. The North American headquarters is in Waltham, Massachusetts and the Asian-Pacific headquarters is located in Hong Kong.


1. All providers need to have a current Risk Analysis that identifies potential threats,
     analyzed solutions, and provides a concrete plan to fix any deficiencies. The Risk Analysis
     must adjust to new threats, such as Ransomware attacks.

2. Covered entities like FMCNA are responsible for all the providers in their network.


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RISKAlert Report # 1005                            January 25, 2018                                   Benton, Kentucky



A 15-year old teenage boy, armed with a handgun, opened fire on Tuesday inside Marshall County High
School, killing two classmates and wounding 18 others. He has not been named yet, but the Assistant Country
Attorney Jason Darnall said he will be charged as an adult.

I talked to a mother with children at the high school, and she described the extreme panic and fear that gripped
the community, where parents didn’t know whether their child was dead or alive.

The unnamed student entered the school’s common area are started shooting, before entering the main building.
According to student Bryson Conkwright, a junior at the school, said he was talking with a friend on Tuesday
morning when he spotted the gunman walking up near him. “It took me a second to process it,” Mr. Conkwright, 17,
told law enforcement.

“One of my best friends got shot in the face, and then another one of my best friends was shot in the shoulder.”
He said he was part of a group of students who fled, kicked down a door to get outside and ran.

This was the 16th mass shooting in the U.S. in 2018!


1. Every school should be required to have instant lockdown. This shooter was
    able to fire his weapon over and over, from outside to inside the school.

2. The school’s communication system was deficient. It should have sent
     texts to all students directing them to an area of refuge, and updating
     frantic parents.



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Shooting at University of Cincinnati Medical Center Ends in Suicide

“I thought he was going to kill everyone”, said the witness taking her child to Cincinnati Children’s
Hospital and Medical Center, before a 20-year-old shot and killed himself after shooting a University of
Cinncinnati Health security guard inside the UC psychiatric emergency services facility.

The man the witness saw was Isaiah Currie, 20, who eventually shot himself after shooting a UC Health security
guard inside the psychiatric emergency services facility on Burnet Avenue.

“He was focused. It was, ‘I’m here to do what I need to do and that’s it,'” she said. “I see him do this and
then drop (the gun) down and then I see the concrete come up, where the bullet had hit the concrete.
I thought he was on his way into the facility and I thought, ‘Oh, my god, he is going to kill everybody

At this point, the witness called 911 to report the suspect. Authorities didn’t know where or how Currie
obtained the two handguns he carried into the lobby Wednesday at UC Medical Center’s Emergency Psychiatric
Services. Cincinnati Police Eliot Isaac said at news conference Thursday that one of the guns had been
reported stolen in Kentucky.

Currie, 20, who had a history of mental illness, shot the security officer twice in the torso, before turning the gun on himself. The officer was reported to be seriously injured.


1. Even when the witness saw the shooter advancing on the hospital, and called 911 – IT WAS ALREADY TOO LATE! Police could not get there in time to prevent the shooting. For an Emergency Psychiatric
facility, use of metal detectors is a MUST HAVE.


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Patient Killed at Hospital


RISKAlert Report Updated:  Jan. 15, 2018

A 46-year old patient, identified as Andrew Merryman, was in a hospital treatment room with his wife on the 14th floor of the Center for Advanced Medicine at 10 a.m. Friday morning.

According to St. Louis Police Lt. Col. Rochelle D. Jones, Merryman pushed his way out of the om and pulled out two pocket knives, she said. As Merryman came down the hall, Jones called security and two officers responded.    Two officers arrived and ordered Merryman to drop the knives. He refused, so both officers fired their guns, killing him. He died at the scene.

Police commented that Mr. Merryman was suicidal and had been treated for depression. Lt. Col. Jones said the guards were being questioned by police as part of the investigation.

Kara Price Shannon, a spokeswoman for Barnes-Jewish Hospital, said police are handling the investigation and directed all questions to them.  “There is no threat to the public or our patients,” she told the Post-Dispatch shortly after the shooting.



  1.  All incoming patients in emotional distress, should be wanded with a metal detector as
    a condition of treatment.  Weapons can be returned as the patient leaves the hospital.

2.  A recent study by Johns Hopkins, discovered that most hospital shootings take
place in the Emergency Room (29%), and only 19% in a patient room.



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Updated:  Jan. 9, 2018

The Long Beach, Calif. Police Department named John Alexander Mendoza, 58, of Redondo Beach, Calif., as the man who shot his two colleagues, one died at the scene, and other was injured at the scene, on Friday afternoon, January 5, 2018.

Attorneys at the Perona, Langer, Beck, Serbin, Mendoza and Harrison firm   in the Long Beach neighborhood of Bixby Knolls, were attending the firm’s holiday party, when Mendoza entered the offices shooting.

Major A. Langer, the firm’s Managing Partner, 75, was killed and Ronald Beck, 64, was wounded in what police called a workplace violence incident.  After shooting Langer and Beck, Mendoza turned the gun on himself. The shooting occurred during a holiday party at the firm when others were present.

Mendoza had apparently been fired earlier in the day, but returned to the firm’s party.  On a report of an active shooter, Long Beach police officers swarmed to the office building. Believing an active shooter was still at work, police formed a small team and quickly went into the office looking for the gunman and any victims, according to a police source briefed on the incident. As they scoured the building, police reportedly came upon multiple groups of screaming and crying workers still hiding or trying to flee, but eventually confirmed the gunman was dead.

The firm has eleven offices in southern California and represented clients including Motley Crue, Pamela Anderson and  Tommy Lee.

Mendoza had worked at Perona Langer Beck for 10 years, said Michael Waks, a lawyer who also has offices in the same building where Perona Langer Beck is located in Long Beach. Mendoza specialized in workers compensation cases.


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